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Leaders, Lecturers & Tour Managers

Emeritus Professor Harriet Edquist AM

Australian curator, and Professor of Architectural History in the School of Architecture and Design at RMIT University in Melbourne. Born and educated in Melbourne, she has both published widely on, and created numerous exhibitions in, the field of Australian architecture, art and design history. With an architectural focus, she has researched the European settlement of the Western District for over two decades, revealing the impact of the Scottish diaspora, the role of the whaling industry in the development of colonial architecture and the dynastic ambitions of settlers such as the Learmonth family.  In 2010, with Dr Lisa Byrne and Prof. Laurene Vaughan, Harriet conducted a four-day artists’ camp in the Western District which led to the acclaimed exhibition The Stony Rises Project and accompanying book Designing Place. Her current research looks at the role of the Clyde Company in the colonial architectural history of Tasmania and Victoria. Her publications include:

  • Edquist, H. 2019, Thomas Learmonth And Sons: Family Capitalism, Scottish Identity And The Architecture Of Victorian Pastoralism In: ABE Journal (Architecture Beyond Europe), , 1 – 21
  • Edquist, H. 2019, Portland Bay and the Origins of European Architecture in Port Phillip 1828-1836 In: Fabrications, 29, 359 – 378
  • Harriet Edquist and Stuart King (eds), 2017, Globalisation, entrepreneurship and the South Pacific. Reframing Australian colonial architecture 1800-1850, Launceston & Melbourne: GESP network https://hcommons.org/deposits/item/hc:16555/
  • Harriet Edquist, 2013, ‘The architectural legacy of the Scots in the Western District of Victoria, Australia’,Architectural Heritage XXIV, 67–85, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press
  • Byrne, L., H. Edquist, L. Vaughan (eds) 2010, Designing Place. An Archaeology of the Western District, Melbourne: Melbourne Books.
  • Harriet Edquist, 2009 ‘Lava Flow’, in Julia Gatley (ed) Cultural Crossroads. Proceedings of the 26th International SAHANZ Conference, Auckland, New Zealand